CLINICAL EVIDENCE

WHITE PAPERS

PACU Case Report

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The Common, Costly, and Deadly Complications of Respiratory Compromise

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POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Evaluation of SuperNO2VA™ Mask Technology in a Clinical Setting

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GRAND ROUNDS PRESENTATIONS

Difficult Airway Management: Current Concepts

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ABSTRACTS

Evaluation of SuperNO2VA™ Mask Technology in a Clinical Setting

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PUBLICATIONS

The Effect of Technology on Difficult Airway Management and Decision Making.
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Predictive Factors of Atelectasis Following Endoscopic Resection.
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Respiratory Complications in Outpatient Endoscopy with Endoscopist-Directed Sedation.
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TESTIMONIALS

CARIN HAGBERG, MD
Dept. of Anesthesiology
University of Texas Medical School at Houston

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Nasal oxygenation in particular is an excellent source of oxygen. It can instill oxygen in the nasopharynx, which then passes through the oropharynx very easily and often much better than a mask applied by mouth.  If we had a process that would be consistent, uniform, easy to use, something like this may enhance our practice even further.”

JOSE TORRES, MD
Emergency Medicine
New York Presbyterian
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“The SuperNO2VA™ [device] takes us from apnea diffusion oxygenation with high flow oxygenation via 15 liters nasal oxygenation to the almost improbable thought of continuous oxygenation/ventilation during intubation. In simple words, we will breath for the patient during intubation even after paralysis. Look at the device and use it and then you will become a believer. What was thought to be impossible is now possible!”

LARA DELONG, MD
Clinical Assistant Professor, Site Director Resident Education
SUNY Downstate Medical Center
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“50 yo obese male w/ PMH: mild intermittent asthma, OSA (AHI: 67.6), HTN, HLD, ESRD, anemia, DM type 2 on insulin w/ retinopathy, obesity (BMI: 34), PVD who was admitted for LGIB. He had a colonoscopy without anesthesia services. He received IV midazolam 1 mg and 25 mcg of fentanyl. Upon arrival to PACU, he required constant verbal stimulation to maintain his SpO2 > 90%. We decided to use the SuperNO2VA™ [device], as we had just been introduced to the device a few hours before. With Robert’s help, we hooked the patient up to the device (flow: 15 LPM) and his saturations improved dramatically to above 95%. After about 15 minutes, he was much more awake and able to maintain his airway independently. After appropriate monitoring in the PACU, he met discharge criteria and was discharged to the floor with SpO2 monitoring.”

VIDEOS


Dr. Carin Hagberg

The SuperNO2VA™ Device

A First Look At The SuperNOVA from AOD

AIRWAY ON-DEMAND PODCAST

Episode 36: A nasal mask for oxygenation and ventilation, with Drs Cataldo and Pedro
LISTEN ON iTUNES

CONTACT

Revolutionary Medical Devices, Inc.
6363 N. Swan Rd. Suite 200
Tucson, AZ 85718
info@rmdevices.com
1-800-224-8194